armed forces

Almost every country feels the need to have armed forces of some kind, to protect its citizens, its borders and its values, and Britain is no exception. While the role and relationship of the armed forces within the wider society changes depending on the location and whether it’s a time of war or peace, the forces need young recruits to maintain their ranks. In countries that do not have conscription, the military uses other ways to attract young people by emphasising the benefits of a stable career and by promising adventure, travel, the chance to better oneself or to serve one’s country.
Britain is one of a few countries that allow people to join the armed forces from age 16. For those not old enough to enlist, there are other ways to get involved, for example through cadet forces. Yet over the last decade, Britain’s military has consistently failed to meet its recruitment targets and has struggled to attract a new generation. Recently, the British Army launched a new recruitment campaign to address this issue called “Be The Best”. In a changing world, how does the Army engage with today’s youth?
Questions:
  • What are the challenges the Army faces recruiting young people?
  • What does the armed forces need and want from young people?
  • Why do the armed forces recruit under 18s in Britain and what opportunities and challenges are raised by recruiting younger people? (Britain is the only country in Europe to do so)

Armed forces make over 300 visits to UK universities in two years | Education | theguardian.com

British universities have opened their doors to allow the armed forces to make 341 visits to recruit students in two years. In response to a Freedom of Information request by the Guardian, the Ministry of Defence reveals the extent to which the armed forces is focusing on universities to enlist students to the army, air force and navy. Its figures show Birmingham has welcomed more recruiters than any other university, with 20 visits since the start of last year.

Source: Armed forces make over 300 visits to UK universities in two years | Education | theguardian.com

Liverpool Armed Forces Day 2017 – Liverpool Echo

Liverpool has been chosen to host the national event for Armed Forces Day in 2017 because of its track record of hosting public spectaculars. The day – which takes place on Saturday, June 24 next year – is a chance for people to show their support and salute the UK’s serving troops, veterans, cadets and service families.

Source: Liverpool Armed Forces Day 2017 – Liverpool Echo

Cash boost for Troops to Teaching after slow start | Schools Week

The scheme is aimed at those who leave the services without degrees. Inspired by a similar programme in the US, it offers two years of school-based training, leading to qualified teacher status and a foundation degree. Trainees are paid between £13,000 and £16,000.

Source: Cash boost for Troops to Teaching after slow start | Schools Week