young people

Every year the British Armed Forces visit thousands of schools, offering presentation teams, ‘careers advisers’, lesson plans, away days, one-to-one mentoring, interviews, and more. They also offer to support young people’s ongoing education, while Cadet Forces offer (almost) free clubs and activities for younger children to get involved with. Youth-oriented media, including films, television and video games, often seem to glorify the exploits of soldiers and armies around the world.
However, a recent survey investigating young people’s attitudes to the armed forces found that they are less positive in their views towards the military than older people. In another recent study, the Army expressed concern that the public’s lack of contact with the military meant that new recruits often do not understand what is expected of them once they enlist.
These seeming contradictions raise interesting issues around young people’s socialisation, education and career prospects. As the Armed Forces become more involved in mainstream education and after-school programmes, are young people able to make informed choices about the role the military plays in their lives?  Do they have access to other options?
Questions:
  • What factors influence young people’s impressions of the Armed Forces?
  • At what age and via what channels would young people typically encounter the Armed Forces in Britain?
  • What techniques does the British Army use to recruit?
  • What are the reasons young people would consider joining the Armed Forces?
 

Michael Fallon launches army cadets scheme at ‘Trojan horse’ school | Politics | The Guardian

guardianschoolcadetforces

Michael Fallon has announced 150 new army cadet units for state schools, with the first launched on Tuesday at the Birmingham school at the centre of the “Trojan horse” row over alleged attempts to introduce a hardline Islamist ethos. Speaking to the Conservative party conference, Fallon said the Ministry of Defence would create the cadet units for state schools, with 25 launching this week, a scheme he said gave young cadets “the skills and confidence they need to thrive”.

Source: Michael Fallon launches army cadets scheme at ‘Trojan horse’ school | Politics | The Guardian

Armed forces make over 300 visits to UK universities in two years | Education | theguardian.com

British universities have opened their doors to allow the armed forces to make 341 visits to recruit students in two years. In response to a Freedom of Information request by the Guardian, the Ministry of Defence reveals the extent to which the armed forces is focusing on universities to enlist students to the army, air force and navy. Its figures show Birmingham has welcomed more recruiters than any other university, with 20 visits since the start of last year.

Source: Armed forces make over 300 visits to UK universities in two years | Education | theguardian.com

Liverpool is far from ‘NEET’ for teenagers – Liverpool Echo

Liverpool has the third highest number of young people not in education, work or training in the UK, new figures reveal. Almost 10% of Liverpool youngsters aged 16-18 are classed as NEET, Not in Education, Employment or Training, according to a Department for Education (DfE) study.

Source: Liverpool is far from ‘NEET’ for teenagers – Liverpool Echo

How Wolverhampton and Coventry drifted apart on youth employment | Business | The Guardian

Youth unemployment figures published this week have underlined the contrasting economic fortunes of two cities an hour’s drive apart, with Wolverhampton having one of the highest jobless rates for 16 to 24-year-olds in the UK, and Coventry one of the lowest. The Guardian visited the two cities to find how their paths have diverged and why young people appear to have such comparative success in finding a job in Coventry, while the story is so different in Wolverhampton.

Source: How Wolverhampton and Coventry drifted apart on youth employment | Business | The Guardian